Using Trail Camera Surveys to Your Advantage

By Nathan Unger

Every summer it is important to get an accurate depiction of the amount and the type of deer that are frequenting your piece of property. How do you do that you ask? Trail camera surveys.

Trail camera surveys will help you understand how many does, fawns and bucks are in the area as well as the buck-to-doe ratio for your specific piece of land. However, as the velvet comes off in late summer and testosterone levels increase in bucks their range can tend to shift as they begin to seek out does and different food sources for the fall months.

No matter if the bucks stay or leave, trail camera surveys will give you a good estimate on age structure of bucks as well as individual characteristics of those bucks.

How to begin

trail camera survey

The first thing you obviously need are trail cameras. Be sure they have plenty of battery life, and if you are doing a survey on public land it’s probably a good idea to secure it with a lock to prevent it from being stolen.

Take your preferred choice of attractant and spread it out over an area 10 to 14 days prior to beginning your survey to give deer time to get used to the site. Also be sure to start the survey prior to acorns or any fruits fall from their trees, or else your survey will not be as accurate as it could be.

When you begin collecting data be sure your camera isn’t facing the sun or you’ll get several pictures with nothing on them which makes going through hundreds upon thousands of pictures monotonous.

Maximize your data

You then want to set your camera on field mode or food plot mode to take pictures at multiple intervals not just when deer cross, or you will miss several deer that otherwise wouldn’t be in range. For example, have it take a couple pictures 3 to 5 seconds apart then every 5 to 10 minutes. Obviously, if you want more pictures you will set it to take pictures more often.

This will enable you to pattern any bucks moving during the daylight hours or any deer for that matter. It will also allow you to see how many fawns are being dropped in addition to any does that remain pregnant.

Here is a portion of a survey we took after the season.

These surveys will show you characteristics of deer as well as if they are huntable or whether they’re strictly moving during nighttime hours.

Trail Cameras

I understand that two or three trail cameras is what most people can afford especially with all the other hunting equipment needed for a successful hunt. You don’t want to use all of your hunting budget your wife gives you on trail cameras.

If you are doing a survey over a field or plot and only have two or three, try to strategically place the cameras where you think the deer are entering and leaving the plot. You may have one buck show up on the south side of the field that would have never been caught on a camera placed on the north end.

After 14 days or so, if you’re not satisfied with your pictures move a camera to a different location and begin the survey again.

Be sure to refresh the mineral sites depending on how fast the deer eat it. You want the deer to consistently show up for 14 to 21  days to provide you ample data for your survey.

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NEXT: New to Mineral Stations? This Will Help.

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3 thoughts on “Using Trail Camera Surveys to Your Advantage

  1. Nathan, just watched your video on Wide Open Spaces. I’m a nuisance wildlife trapper and have trapped for a long time but still watch everything I can cause if you’re not learning you’re dieing. Your set was a good solid set and congrats on the Yote. The most important part was the follow up video where you showed your catch. Your testimony and analogy of us being trapped by sin was what I needed to hear this morning. Keep up the good work and may God keep blessing you.

    Like

  2. Pingback: 3 Keys to Late Season Success | Bulldawg Outdoors

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