WHITETAIL GURU HUNTING PODCAST #2: HUNTING PUBLIC LAND AND TOURNAMENT ARCHERY WITH BRIAN GROSSMAN OF QDMA

On this podcast we talk to the Quality Deer Management Association’s Communications Manager, Brian Grossman. Brian is a native to Kentucky and now lives in west Georgia. In our discussion we dive into lots of great information for archery, public land hunting as well as the benefits of joining QDMA.

We encourage you to listen to the podcast by clicking the link below. If you like the podcast please also take time to subscribe and leave us a review on iTunes by clicking the link below. These positive reviews and subscriptions help us more than you know.

iTunes link: Episode #2

In this episode we discuss: 

  • Brian’s work with QDMA
  • The QDMA Whitetail Deer Report
  • What a quota hunt is
  • Special Opportunity Hunt with Brian’s daughter
  • Tournament archery shoots and clubs
  • His website Georgia Afield
  • Successful public land Georgia hunts this year
  • Hunting public land turkeys

Show Notes: 

Analyzing Terrain Features on Small Properties

Using terrain features is key on small properties. Knowing how mature bucks are moving will increase your odds of harvesting a mature buck.

By Nathan Unger

Twitter: @Bulldawgoutdoor
Instagram: @Bulldawgoutdoors

Small properties might be some of the most overlooked gems in the deer hunting world. While it’s difficult to keep and sustain mature bucks on the property for any amount of time it can be favorable to pattern them as their passing through.

That being said an ideal parcel will have bedding areas nearby that keep the deer close. Locating these and setting up accordingly could pay big dividends.

Keeping in that in mind, a hunter needs to identify the terrain features that sprinkle the landscape. Okay, so how do we do that?

1.) Scout from an observation stand

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You might have to get creative with this one depending on the layout of your property. Take ample time to observe how the deer utilize the contours of the land to get from point A to point B. One of the small parcels I hunt took me nearly three years to figure out how the deer moved throughout it. Now, that might have been one year too long. I didn’t rigorously hunt this property the first year I had permission to hunt.

This leads me to my next point.

2.) Only hunt optimal conditions

I cannot stress this enough. If you hunt too much or when the wind isn’t in your favor it could mess up your whole season. Deer notice when someone is in their bedroom or trekking through their territory. The last thing you want is to force your only one or two mature bucks to go nocturnal or to shift their core areas.

3.) Enable good entrance and exit routes

Entering and exiting your stand is of the utmost importance. I’m still learning this. If you bump deer going into your stand good luck trying to make amends the rest of the season. Even worse if a mature buck sees AND smells your presence you might as well do one of two things. Hunt only the rut or find a different hunting property. Access is that important and might be the difference in a successful or unsuccessful season.

4.) Identify prime treestand sites

Because you’re hunting a small parcel your stand sites are limited. You have to consider the aforementioned access routes and wind tendencies. Placing a stand in the correct spot will change the game on small acreage. Try to get as a high as possible in your set, yet still staying safe. You might have to go up a hill or climb 5 to 10 more feet vertically. This will give you a better chance of getting above any air current that might be swirling where you are hunting.

Here’s the kicker. A majority of the time in order to be successful on small parcels all of these previously mentioned points must be put into action.

Good luck and good hunting!

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Why I Slept In Instead of Going Hunting

A lot of times we think the more times we go hunting the better chance we have of killing a big buck. That might not always be the case.

Quality sits far outweigh quantity of sits.

As I mature as a hunter and learn new tips and tricks with experience I’ve come to find out that it is not the quantity of sits in a tree stand that leads to success but the quality of sits.

Oftentimes we think that the more hours we put in the better chance we’ll have of shooting a nice mature buck. When in reality this is not always the case.

If a hunter constantly walks into his tree stand on poor weather conditions or when the wind isn’t right or late in the evening after work he or she increases the odds of educating a mature buck. I recently heard somebody say, “if someone walks into your house you’re going to know they are there.” The same goes for these old bruisers as well.

Another reason I don’t feel guilty for sleeping in is because if you’re like me and you have trail cameras and you’re not getting any pictures of mature bucks during legal shooting hours then don’t think he’s randomly just going to show up under your tree stand when you’re hunting. Am I saying it isn’t possible? Not at all. Crazy things happen. What I’m saying is the majority of mature bucks are going to change their pattern especially in the early season when they are in their food-to-bed routines.

quality deer hunting sits

Additionally, because of the change in food sources during the early season, if you’re not getting pictures at all of those mature bucks that you were getting during the summer it’s probably because they have switched food sources. The key is finding out what that new favored food source is.

A similar factor that has been dictating deer movement in my home state of Georgia is the lack of rain. We haven’t had rain in over a month at least, and the deer are sticking close to where the water sources are. Be sure to plan your sits around a water source during these times of drought because most of these mature bucks will be bedding during the day, going straight to food and water and directly back to their beds. If you are not hunting somewhere in between chances are you’ll never see him.

What if I only have one week to hunt?

My answer to that would be save it for either the rut or late season when the weather is cooler. Unless you have ample camera data where that mature buck is moving during legal shooting hours I wouldn’t even risk using a weeks vacation in the early season. I understand not everyone can go hunting 30-to-40 times a season, so choose wisely the time of year you can take off. I certainly wish I could go more than I do, but I also realize I’m fortunate enough to go more often than a lot of people can. In which case if you only have one week you have to go.

The experience of deer hunting far outweighs not going at all just because the conditions are not perfect. Maximize weather conditions (i.e. wind, rain, temperature, pressure, etc.) the best you can and enjoy the process. It’s better to be out hunting rather than sitting inside and not hunting at all.

Like what you see here? You can read more awesome hunting-related articles by Nathan Unger at the Bulldawg Outdoors blog. Follow him on Twitter @Bulldawgoutdoor and on Instagram @Bulldawgoutdoors

NEXTHunting Bad Weather Conditions: Is It Worth The Trouble?

Chasing My Dream

As a boy, I always wondered what I would do as I grew into adulthood. It wasn’t because I was unsure about my career choice, but it was because I wondered how I would make it a full time career.

I grew up hunting and fishing in middle Georgia and always dreamed of owning my own hunting camp or farm one day to manage and take care of myself. However this isn’t the most popular choice because many people view the outdoors much like they view reading a book or riding a bike. Just a hobby. So over the years I’ve wondered how I can make it my career. I’ve spent a lot of time in the woods and by the lake mulling over how this dream would come true. One of my biggest role models in this particular area is my uncle who for as long as I’ve know him has made a good living and has been able to travel to various places and see some pretty incredible animals and landscapes. However, he still works a full-time job and takes these trips one or twice a year. Yes, such a career as traveling and seeing the outdoors can be expensive, but, it takes starting at the bottom and working your way up. Over my 22 years I’ve boiled it down to three points that are essential for my dream to become a reality.

1. Do not give up or give in

2. Keep chasing despite critics

3. Work hard

Now these are very simple, but maybe a more professional blogger and deer hunter can articulate it better than I.

http://wiredtohunt.com/2013/10/04/today-im-quitting-my-job-for-deer-for-you-and-for-a-dream/

This blog has inspired me to not give up my dream of the outdoors, and to pursue it relentlessly even if it means making some sacrifices. Author of the blog, Wired To Hunt says it best,

“So that I may fully pursue my dream of chasing whitetails and sharing my experiences with the world. And so that I may truly live.” – Mark Kenyon

What will I do, you might ask?

I will continue to pursue my dream relentlessly until I hit a wall and then I will find a way around or through the wall and press on until my dream is reached!

(Written by Mr. Nathan Unger. Nathan is a Senior at the University of Georgia majoring in Public Relations. Nathan is an avid hunter and a passionate outdoorsman from Southwest Virginia)