Whitetail Guru Hunting Podcast #44: (Part 2) Rut Update, Lockdown, Late Season Tactics

Learn how to approach the late season with these tactics we discuss.

On this podcast mini-sode we break down our rut hunts as well as my late season tactics that we’ll implement over the next few weeks. This is a short segment detailing with what we’ve been seeing in the woods. Though it may not necessarily be the same in your region hopefully some of these ideas will make something click for you as the hunter to have success this season.

We encourage you to listen to the podcast by clicking the link below. If you like the podcast please also take time to subscribe and leave us a review on iTunes by clicking the link below. These positive reviews and subscriptions help us more than you know.

iTunes link: Episode #44

Whitetail Guru Hunting Podcast Episode 44

https://soundcloud.com/john-holcomb-99649240/whitetail-guru-hunting-podcast-episode-44-late-season-tactics

In this episode we discuss:

    • Rut hunting updates
    • Weather fronts
    • Lock-down phase
    • Late season tactics
    • Buck movement
    • Time in the stand
    • Hunting food sources
    • Hunting edges and transitions

Show Notes: 

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WHITETAIL GURU HUNTING PODCAST #4: JAMES EDMUNDS OF NON TYPICAL OUTDOORS TALKS MANAGING MATURE BUCKS

In this podcast we talk to James Edmunds of Non Typical Outdoors about how he is consistently killing big bucks.

Today on the show we talk with Virginia Delegate and founder of Non Typical Outdoors, James Edmunds.  James and his family are consistently harvesting big deer on their farm in which they have implemented an intensive management plan. In our discussion we dive into lots of great information about deer sanctuaries, creating mineral sites, growing free-range, mature bucks and productive food plot blends.

We encourage you to listen to the podcast by clicking the link below. If you like the podcast please also take time to subscribe and leave us a review on iTunes by clicking the link below. These positive reviews and subscriptions help us more than you know.

iTunes link: Episode #4

In this episode we discuss: 

  • Growing mature bucks
  • Intensive management plan
  • Food plot blends
  • Creating mineral stations
  • Virginia hunter numbers
  • Hound hunting
  • Hunter recruitment

Show Notes: 

3 Tactics to Late Season Scouting

Late season scouting is essential for getting ready for next season.

These 3 late season scouting tactics will get you ready for next season.

As deer season nears to a close several hunters are packing it in for the winter months. They might try harvesting one or two more does for the freezer or try for that elusive giant that seems to be skirting daylight hours. Whatever the case may be, there are late season scouting tactics that could prove helpful for next year’s season.

Seek Out Bedding

A tactic that could make the entire difference in your deer season next year is locating bedding areas. Because much of the flora has lost its spring density deer are more limited to where they can bed – unless you created several bedding areas by hinge cutting in the off season.  However, knowing where these bedding areas are could be dynamite for the rut, especially doe bedding areas. Additionally, this knowledge of bedding areas will provide a head start for locating buck movement during the late season next year.

Know the Food

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Depending on the crop year depends on where whitetails congregate throughout the season. If orchards are present on your land then that might be the early season food of choice. If you planted clover then deer might prefer that throughout the summer and early fall. There are so many options it really takes knowing what your deer herd prefers. Also identifying what’s naturally growing on your hunting parcel will you give an idea of what deer eat on a day-to-day basis.

This year in southern Virginia we had a large white oak acorn crop. Deer, especially mature bucks, did not need to move as much because the acorns were literally feet from their bed. The hard part was figuring out which bed they were in. The catch 22 was that a neighboring property timbered several acres three years ago, and just this year the secondary succession was perfect for deer bedding. Needless to say it was quite the chess match.

However, if you don’t have a bumper acorn crop where are the deer focusing their feeding movements? Is it a cut corn field? Could it be alfalfa or brassica? It could be any or all of these. What’s pertinent is that you find what the deer are feeding on in your region. Up until this point this season, deer still are not feeding on the brassica which they have enjoyed in the past three years. It might just take another month or so before they shift to this. Unfortunately, it might be a month too late. Know what your deer feed on when, and it could be the difference of harvesting or not harvesting a mature buck this winter.

Find the Travel Routes

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Late season can be tough because many deer become nocturnal and wait in staging areas until it gets dark. Find these staging areas, hang a stand, make sure the wind is in your favor and wait. I’ve witnessed deer hold up right inside a wood line until dark. I’m sure many of you have witnessed this as well. The reason is because deer have been pressured by hunters all year and are more wary of predators.

Simultaneously, you can begin looking at these funnels and pinch points for clues to next year’s season. Observe where these deer are moving and ask yourself, “why are the deer being funneled this way?” Is there a terrain feature? Is it the wind? Are there drainages that are impossible for the deer to cross? Search these out and take advantage of where it forces the deer. Sometimes in the winter it can be easier to identify these funnels, drainages and crossings because the leaves have fallen and line of sight is clearer.

Whatever your goals are for late season hunting, make sure to take every advantage to scout for the next year as well.It could be the difference.

Like what you see here? You can read more awesome hunting articles by Nathan Unger at the Bulldawg Outdoors Facebook page. Follow him on Twitter @Bulldawgoutdoor and on Instagram @Bulldawgoutdoors.

NEXT:3 Keys to Late Season Success

Four Things I Learned From The 2014 Deer Season

By: Nathan Unger

With each new hunting season comes new obstacles, new challenges and hopefully new trophies. That’s why each hunting season is just as exciting as the last if not more exciting.  Sometimes this means that unexpected scenarios occur that one needs to be aware of in order to be put in a position to put the big buck down. Here are five things I learned or was reminded of this year after nearly a decade of hunting.

1.) Preparation = Success.

This might be a no-brainer, but the little things that are done correctly ahead of time can put you in a position to succeed when you’re on stand during the peak time of the season. Those that hunt out of box stands can make sure to clean out leaves, wasp nests and other clutter that can make noise when you’re hunting. Make sure that stands are tightened and seats are oiled somehow. WD-40 is easy to use in order to eliminate squeaks and unnecessary sounds when hunting. Be sure that rotten wood is replaced and loose wood is properly tightened. These simple tasks can be avoided during the season and can provide great success when the hunting is hot.

2.) Spooking deer will not always ruin your hunt.

It’s always a hunter’s nightmare when he or she spooks deer walking into a stand. Unfortunately I learned this the hard way this year when I had a late start to my stand and spooked a herd bedding in the woods on a hillside on my way in. These deer either winded me or saw me or both, but either way it was not a good beginning to my hunt. However, a separate occasion I started walking into my stand and spooked a group that was bedding down in a thicket. Later that morning, my brother killed his biggest buck to date near where I had spooked the deer a couple hours earlier. The key to this success is playing the wind. This might be obvious, but it’s the solid truth. This was the first year in my hunting experience that I really paid attention to the wind, and nearly every time we had success was because the wind was in our favor.

3.) Know the food of choice each season

This year was an exceptional year for acorns which in my neck of the woods, pun intended, made it hard to hunt over food plots. Typically we’re fortunate enough to take a deer or two over our food plot each season, but this year we didn’t take a single one. Given, there were a lot of variables involved for not hunting the plots as much such as more deer on a certain portion of the property, hunting more often on or near the woods and hunting a deer we had patterned near a stand on a treeline. However, these variables all had three common factors: ample acorns, a water source and a bedding area. Piles and piles of acorns layered the ground this year which allowed deer not to have to travel as much, especially later in the season.

4.) Never take your property for granted

I think sometimes we forget how blessed we really are. Some hunters may have the means to hunt thousands of acres, and some may have less than one hundred. Either way it could all be gone in the blink of an eye. Whether it gets sold, ravaged by fires, cut for timber or the deer simply just leave it doesn’t matter. The point I’m trying to make is to enjoy the time you have while you have it. Enjoy it with friends or with family but don’t forget to take a moment to sit back and be thankful for the blessings given to you.

(Written by Mr. Nathan Unger. Nathan is a Senior at the University of Georgia majoring in Public Relations. Nathan is an avid hunter and a passionate outdoorsman from Southwest Virginia)